Gardens

Mid-Summer Container Refresher

Have some of the annuals in your mixed pots or boxes stopped flowering? This isn’t unusual because some of the annuals that are so perfect for spring planting don’t bloom as well once the temperatures rise. This doesn’t mean that they’re bad plants…it just means that our mid-summer weekend project should be evaluating our container plantings and refreshing them as needed. Here’s an example, beginning with how my urns looked in May.

Here's how this container looked in late May. I chose these annuals because they are all cold-tolerant so I knew I could plant them early and not be afraid of frost or cold damage. I used Frosty Knight Lobularia, Blue Bird Nemesia, Lemon Slice Calibrachoa, and in the center, a Soprano Purple Osteospermum.

Here’s how this container looked in late May. I chose these annuals because they are all cold-tolerant so I knew I could plant them early and not be afraid of frost or cold damage. I used Frosty Knight Lobularia, Blue Bird Nemesia, Lemon Slice Calibrachoa, and in the center, a Soprano Purple Osteospermum…all from Proven Winners.

Here is how this same urn looks today, on July 24th. The Lemon Slice and Frosty Knight are going strong. There are a few flowers on the Blue Bird Nemesia, and if I cut them back now they should come back with renewed flowering soon. But the Osteospermum? It's really done. You can see the tall, lanky green foliage in the center of the pot. Since this isn't bringing anything to the party, it's time to replace that center plant.

Here is how this same urn looks today, on July 24th. The Lemon Slice and Frosty Knight are going strong. There are a few flowers on the Blue Bird Nemesia, and if I cut them back now they should come back with renewed flowering soon. But the Osteospermum? It’s really done. Osteospermum is a cool-weather annual, kind of like pansies; they are great early in the season but in July you should thank them for coming and plant something else. You can see the tall, lanky, Osteospermum foliage in the center of the pot. Since this isn’t bringing anything to the party, it’s time to replace that center plant.

Dig around the annual that you need to remove using a trowel. Remove a plug of roots that is about the size of the root ball that you're going to replace it with. By not removing too much beyond just what you need to create the space for the new plant, you won't disturb the other plants too much.

Dig around the annual that you need to remove using a trowel. Remove a plug of roots that is about the size of the root ball that you’re going to replace it with. By not removing too much beyond just what you need to create the space for the new plant, you won’t disturb the other plants too much.

After the plant is out hollow out the hole to make a space that's about the size of the rootball for the plant you're installing. If you're using time-release fertilizer put some in this hole before placing the new plant inside.

After the plant is out hollow out the hole to make a space that’s about the size of the root ball for the plant you’re installing. If you’re using time-release fertilizer put some in this hole before placing the new plant inside.

Put the new plant in place making sure that any spaces are filled with soil. But don't pack it down or push the plant in too hard! Air spaces are important for all the plants here.

Put the new plant in place making sure that any spaces are filled with soil. But don’t pack it down or push the plant in too hard! Air spaces are important for all the plants here.

Done! The Fuchsia 'Firecracker' that I chose adds an upright element and a dash of color that compliments and contrasts with the other flowers in this urn. Be sure to water your container really well after you put any new plants in place.

Done! The Fuchsia ‘Firecracker’ that I chose adds an upright element and a dash of color that compliments and contrasts with the other flowers in this urn. Be sure to water your container really well after you put any new plants in place. If you haven’t used a time-release fertilizer use a liquid product according to directions after your container has been well watered.

 

 

 

 

 

Food

Green Bean Pâté

green_bean_pate

Years ago I used to make the green bean pâté recipe out of the The Moosewood Cookbook by Mollie Katzen. Over time my recipe has evolved from that original as I’ve added flavors and substituted ingredients. It is still a favorite at the time of year when green beans need to be picked every other day.

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Gardens

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Here is the finished plant. The leaves hide the cords and because the stems are supported at different levels the plant doesn't look "tied to a stake."

We love hydrangeas because their flowers are so huge and showy, yet often those large blooms are so heavy that they end up down in the mud. ‘Annabelle’ is one of the worst in my garden, so it’s the one I support every year. Here’s what I do:

Here is how my ‘Annabelle’ looks

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Lifestuff

Worth Fussing With

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I thought of this question

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Love This!

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Name:   Kniphofia ‘Mango Popsicle’ ‘Papaya Popsicle’ and ‘Pineapple Popsicle’

Type of Plant:  Perennial for full sun in zones 6 -8

Why I love this:   In the past I didn’t pay any attention to the Kniphofias commonly known as red hot pokers. They were glorious for the ten minutes when they were in bloom, but after

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Crafts

Make a Lavender Wand

lavender_wand_finished_wrapped_p

As the lavender flowers in the garden just start to fade it’s time to make lavender wands! Your plants need to be deadheaded anyway so that they may produce some new flowers later in the fall, weather permitting. Yet the flowers are still fragrant and weaving lavender wands is the perfect way to celebrate mid-summer.

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